Print

From Mme Martin to the Guérins CF 80 - July 21, 1872.


From Mme Martin to the Guérins

July 21, 1872

I received the letter with the picture of your little Marie, which we all found charming. She has the sensible expression of a big girl and seems much stronger than when I saw her. I sent the photograph to my sister the same day. At the Visitation, the school vacation begins August 5.

I’m fully expecting all of you to come next month. The troubles didn’t happen as had been predicted. Now I don’t believe it any more for this year, and I’m quite determined not to rely on any prophet, nor on any prophecy. I’m beginning to become quite an unbeliever. I say that only God knows the day and the hour. Others think they see something there, and they see nothing. So then I expect all of you. You’ll let me know, of course, a week in advance.

I must share with you an event that will probably take place at the end of the year, but which is of hardly any interest to anyone but me at the moment and still doesn’t delight anyone else. However, I would be happy over it if I knew I could raise this poor little person who is coming to live in our home (first mention of the existence of Marie-Françoise-Thérèse Martin – the future Saint Thérèse - Zélie is four months pregnant), who will not leave it as long as he and I are alive.

I’m feeling better than the last time. I have a good appetite and never have a fever. I hope this child does well. Misfortune isn’t always at the same door. Oh well, may God’s will be done!

Madame Z had a little girl last month. I haven’t gone to see her, and I’ve hardly any desire to do so. After her marriage, she seems to not want to look at me anymore. I, who loved her so much; this hurts me.

Before her marriage, she couldn’t do enough for me. I think now that she wasn’t very sincere and expected me to be the intermediary for her marriage to Lacauve’s cousin, which she wanted so much. But now she probably finds herself too far above me. So she often comes to see the doctor’s wife, who lives quite near here, but there’s no danger of her entering our house!

This world is so strange! So, the woman Madame Z visits makes fun of her as much as she can; I know this from the maid. And as for Madame Z, she can’t stand her, but these are people who are drawn to each other by their ideas and their tastes. All of this makes me more and more detached from this world that’s so false. I don’t want to become attached to anyone except God and my family.

 

 © Society of St. Paul / Alba House

Back to the list